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Tutorials

Begin your experience by attending half- or full-day tutorials. Please note that you must register for the tutorial(s) you want to attend as space is limited and many sell out quickly.

Tutorials
MA An Introduction to SAFe: The Scaled Agile Framework NEW
Al Shalloway, Net Objectives
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 8:30am - 4:30pm

The Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) is quickly being adopted by many large organizations that have had some success with agile at the team level but have not been able to scale up to large projects. Al Shalloway describes what SAFe is, discusses when and how to implement it, and provides a few extensions to SAFe. Al begins with a high-level, executive’s guide to SAFe that you can share with your organization’s leaders. He then covers the aspects of implementing SAFe: identifying the sequence of features to work, establishing release trains, the SAFe release planning event, SAFe’s variant of Scrum, and when to use the SAFe process. Al concludes with extensions to SAFe including creating effective teams—even when it doesn’t look possible—and implementing shared services and DevOps in SAFe using kanban. Get an introduction to SAFe, discover whether it would be useful to your organization, and identify the steps you should take to be SAFe.

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Learn more about Al Shalloway.
MB Software Requirements Fundamentals for BAs, Testers, and Developers NEW
Lee Copeland, Software Quality Engineering
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 8:30am - 4:30pm

You deal with software requirements all the time. Whether you are a developer in an agile environment, an analyst who identifies and documents requirements for plan-driven development, a software designer who studies requirements as the basis for agile development, a tester who employs or often must discover requirements as the foundation of test cases, or a technical user who describes your needs to development, you need the right approaches and skills to develop and interpret software requirements. Join Lee Copeland to learn how to identify all the important stakeholders of a system and better ways to elicit and capture requirements in different settings: one-on-one interviews, meetings, brainstorming and Joint Application Development (JAD) sessions, buddy checks, inspections, ambiguity reviews, and retrospectives. Discover ways to ferret out the big risks, unknowns, and unresolved conflicts that often doom projects from the start.

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Learn more about Lee Copeland.
MC Career Superpowers NEW
James Whittaker, Microsoft
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

Line up all the successful people in the world. Take away the pedigreed and the prodigies—you know the people who are going to succeed no matter what. Remove the brown-nosers and right-time-right-place lottery winners. And who do you have left? People who succeeded on purpose. Study these folks carefully, and you’ll find their paths to the top have common themes. James Whittaker exposes the career strategies of the ultra-successful and analyzes them in detail. Learn about personal strategies for identifying high-payoff activities and gain insight into being more effective as an individual contributor, manager, and leader. Discover how to identify and interact with the right set of career mentors and role models. Being successful doesn’t have to be an accident. Join James and learn how to succeed—on purpose.

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Learn more about James Whittaker.
MD Specification by Example: Mastering Agile Testing
Nate Oster, CodeSquads, LLC
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

On agile teams, testers can struggle to keep up with the pace of development if they continue employing a waterfall verification process―finding bugs after development. Nate Oster challenges you to question waterfall assumptions and replace a “test last” mentality with “specification by example.” Practice “test first” by writing executable specifications for a new feature before development begins. Learn to switch from tests as verification to tests as specification and guide development with concrete examples written in the language of your business. Start by joining a team for a humorous simulation of real-world issues and experience. Learn how specification by example helps build in quality instead of trying to test defects out. Progress to increasingly more realistic scenarios and practice the art of specifying intent with table-based and given-when-then formats. These paper-based simulations give you meaningful practice with specifying concrete examples and will change the way you think about writing tests and collaborating as a team. This is not a “tools” session (no laptops required).

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Learn more about Nate Oster.
ME Build Product Backlogs with Test-Driven Thinking—and More NEW Monday, November 10, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

Many product backlogs of user stories are nothing more than glorified to-do lists. Teams have lost the idea of prioritizing real business value and, instead, focus only on finishing stories and accumulating story points. Join David Hussman as he drives a stake into the heart of lame backlogs and breathes new life into test-driven thinking that is meaningful to testers, developers, product owners, and others. Using real-world examples, David shares his experiences and teaches tools you can use to fuse centered-product thinking with end-to-end testing. These techniques include: developing test-driven user experiences, improving product discovery (backlog grooming) sessions with testing talk, adding story clarity with examples and tests, validating requirements with tests, connecting program teams by decomposing product ideas into small testable stories, and recomposing them to validate product level learning. Because we learn by doing and questioning as we go, show up ready to work. Bring your failing product backlog stories and discuss them, too.

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Learn more about David Hussman.
MF What’s Your Leadership IQ?
Jennifer Bonine, tap|QA, Inc.
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

Have you ever needed a way to measure your leadership IQ? Or been in a performance review where the majority of time was spent discussing your need to improve as a leader? If you have ever wondered what your core leadership competencies are and how to build on and improve them, Jennifer Bonine shares a toolkit to help you do just that. This toolkit includes a personal assessment of your leadership competencies, explores a set of eight dimensions of successful leaders, provides suggestions on how you can improve competencies that are not in your core set of strengths, and describes techniques for leveraging and building on your strengths. These tools can help you become a more effective and valued leader in your organization. Exercises help you gain an understanding of yourself and strive for balanced leadership through recognition of both your strengths and your “development opportunities.”

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Learn more about Jennifer Bonine.
MG The Secrets of Estimating—ANYTHING NEW
Payson Hall, Catalysis Group, Inc.
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

Given the choice between providing an estimate or getting a root canal, most people would choose the dentist―not because they enjoy pain, but because the pain of the drill is short lived and the pain of a poor estimate may last for months. Payson Hall believes there is a science to estimation that is learnable and that much of the pain can be avoided with a repeatable process. In this experiential workshop, Payson shares a way to estimate just about ANYTHING and demonstrates it with numerous examples. He introduces an estimation model that can be applied to any task and shows how to harness the dangerous power of assumptions as a force for reason. When well-estimated tasks are collected into dependency networks, projects often overrun their dates. Payson shows you why this happens and what you can do to better defend your schedules from common sources of delay. Come and estimate.

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Learn more about Payson Hall.
MH Configuration Management: Robust Practices for Fast Delivery NEW
Bob Aiello, CM Best Practices Consulting
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

Robust configuration management (CM) practices are critical for creating continuous builds to support agile’s integration and testing demands, and for rapidly packaging, releasing, and deploying applications into production. Classic CM—identifying system components, controlling changes, reporting the system’s configuration, and auditing—won’t do the trick anymore. Bob Aiello presents an in-depth tour of a more robust and powerful approach to CM consisting of six key functions: source code management, build engineering, environment management, change management and control, release management, and deployment. Bob describes current and emerging CM trends—support for agile development, cloud computing, and mobile apps development—and reviews the industry standards and frameworks available in practice today. Take back an integrated approach to establish proper IT governance and compliance using the latest CM practices while offering development teams the most effective CM practices available today.

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Learn more about Bob Aiello.
MI CANCELLED - Seven Principles of Impossible Thinking NEW
Ian Rowland, Independent Consultant
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

This Tutorial has been cancelled.

By entering Ian Rowland’s world in which business strategy and magical thinking overlap, you can learn to solve problems and accomplish goals that at first glance seem impossible. Ian presents a range of demonstrations that may hurt your brain but open your mind to new ways of solving seemingly intractable problems. Discover the seven principles of Impossible Thinking that enable you to think in curves, twists, and warps that lead not only to fresh solutions but also to significant business advantage. Ian illustrates this with detailed real-life case studies where impossible thinking meant the difference between failure and significant success—and even market domination. This no-PowerPoint/no-snoring presentation has performance elements and plenty of interactive participation where your mind does things you didn’t know it could. Leave this tutorial able to think in ways that are both fascinating and beautifully illogical—and make all the difference between failure and success.

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Learn more about Ian Rowland.
MJ Building a Culture of Trust Where Agile Thrives NEW
Pollyanna Pixton, Accelinnova
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

We know that teams and individuals who take ownership of their work outperform—often by 50 percent—those who don’t. And in agile, team ownership is a key principle. However, leaders often struggle with letting their teams own their work. Leaders are afraid that if they trust, their teams will fail. So leaders must create a culture of trust and help their teams take ownership. But what if the team builds the wrong product? Teams must align with the strategy and purpose of the business as well as with value to the customer. Finally, the organization must deal honestly with ambiguity. Pollyanna Pixton provides you with the tools to create a culture of trust by dealing with fear of collaboration, helping teams take ownership, aligning with the business by using decision filters based on a business values, and helping teams show real progress while not committing until all risks are within an acceptable range.

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Learn more about Pollyanna Pixton.
MS A Swift Kickstart: Introducing the Swift Programming Language NEW
Daniel Steinberg, Dim Sum Thinking, Inc.
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 8:30am - 4:30pm

If you are an experienced developer who hasn't had a chance to look at the new Swift Programming Language, this workshop is for you! Begin the day with a look at functions in Swift—standalone functions that are not part of a class or other Swift type. Examples will range from helloWorld() to functions that generate other functions and functions that take other functions as parameters. You will be introduced to functions with no parameters, one or more parameters, parameters with default values, and variadic parameters. Learn how to give or hide external names for your parameters and how to create functions that return zero, one, or more values. Along the way, we will need to save state somewhere. In Swift, we carefully distinguish between the case in which our values are only set once and the case in which our values are variable. We will build our examples on four new fundamental Swift entities: String, Int, Dictionary, and Array, which are implemented as structs. We will create mutable and immutable arrays and learn different ways of iterating through them and changing values along the way. Round out the day with Swift types—including classes, objects, protocols, structs, modules, and enumerations. We will look at how to initialize elements from a class, struct, or enumeration and how to add properties and methods to these types. We will discuss the differences between classes and structs and between structs and enumerations. We will introduce power and flexibility through optionals, generics, and closures, use the Swift REPL and Playgrounds to explore some of these aspects of the language, and create projects to explore the rest.

Laptop Required. Delegates should have strong programming skills and should have the most recent version of Xcode 6 installed on your Mac.

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Learn more about Daniel Steinberg.
MK Continuous Integration and Deployment through Continuous Testing NEW
Jared Richardson, Agile Artisans
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

Continuous integration and continuous testing are two vital agile feedback loops that lead to a continuous deployment environment. Continuous integration monitors your source code―recompiling after every change, running smaller tests, and notifying the developer if anything goes wrong. Continuous testing (and potentially continuous deployment) monitors integration builds, installs the product in a staging environment, and runs integration tests, again looking for problems. Jared Richardson explains the ideas and then the tools needed to implement both continuous integration and continuous deployment. Jared demonstrates Jenkins, an open source continuous integration tool, as the center of the process. These powerful concepts ensure issues are detected within minutes of most code changes, and the developer is notified so he can fix the problem and learn from the experience. Even a partial adoption changes the cadence of a development organization and eliminates a great deal of ongoing code maintenance. Learn how to sell the idea and set up the process in your own organization.

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Learn more about Jared Richardson.
ML Twelve Risks to Enterprise Software Projects—and What to Do about Them
Payson Hall, Catalysis Group, Inc.
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

Every large software project is unique—each with its own complex array of challenges. When projects get into trouble, however, they often exhibit similar patterns, and succumb to risks that could have been anticipated and prevented—or detected sooner and managed better. Common responses to the problems—blaming, deferring action, or outright denial—only make things worse. Payson Hall reviews a dozen patterns he has observed over and over again on troubled projects during his thirty-year career: trouble with subcontractors, challenges with project sponsors, friction within the team, perils of interfacing with adjacent systems, issues with data cleansing and conversion, and more. Payson shares the tools he uses to help identify the symptoms of common risks, reduce the likelihood of risks occurring, facilitate early detection of problems, and establish a foundation for helpful responses when problems arise. This session is designed for project managers, team leaders, project sponsors, and anyone responsible for building or rolling out large enterprise systems.

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Learn more about Payson Hall.
MM The Role of the Agile Business Analyst
Steve Adolph, Blue Agility
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

The business analyst (BA) role seems conspicuously absent from most agile methods. Does agile make the BA role obsolete? Certainly not! But how does a BA exploit the short cycle times and collaborative nature of agile methods? Drawing from the principles of lean product development flow, Steve Adolph introduces five principles for the agile BA—Open the Channels, Chart the Flow, Generate Flow, Lean Out the Flow, and Bridge the Flow. As a communicator, the BA must Open the Channels and Chart the Flow to align all stakeholders. BAs can leverage traditional tools such as use cases to Generate Flow and feed user stories to fast moving agile teams. However, large backlogs of stories are wasteful, so lean principles are applied to Lean Out the Flow. Finally BAs may need to Bridge the Flow between more traditional elements of the organization and its agile teams. Whether you are a BA new to agile or struggling to find the right fit in your team, join this highly interactive session to “get your flow” going.

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Learn more about Steve Adolph.
MN Essential Test-Driven Development
Rob Myers, Agile Institute
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

Test-driven development (TDD) is a powerful technique for combining software design, unit testing, and coding in a continuous process to increase reliability and produce better code design. Using the TDD approach, developers write programs in very short development cycles: first the developer writes a failing automated test case that defines a new function or improvement, then produces code to pass that test, and finally refactors the new code to acceptable standards. The developer repeats this process many times until the behavior is complete and fully tested. Rob Myers demonstrates the essential TDD techniques, including unit testing with the common xUnit family of open source development frameworks, refactoring as just-in-time design, plus Fake It, Triangulate, and Obvious Implementation. During this hands-on session, you’ll use exercises to practice the techniques. With many years of product development experience using TDD, Rob will address the questions that arise during your own relaxed exploration of test-driven development.

Laptop Required. Delegates should have strong programming skills and be familiar with an object-oriented language and programming techniques. Delegates should bring a laptop installed with their favorite programming language and IDE—and come prepared to write code. You may need to download JUnit for Java, NUnit for any .NET language, QUnit or Jasmine for JavaScript. For any other language choice (e.g., C++ or Ruby), you will need to install and verify your chosen IDE and xUnit framework prior to the tutorial, as technical support for those platforms will be very limited.

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Learn more about Rob Myers.
MO It’s All About Me™: Owning Your Behavior, Improving Your Team NEW
Doc List, Doc List Enterprises
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

Successful high-performing teams have many common attributes. One is their ability to function together collaboratively. In order to collaborate well, they must communicate effectively and get beyond some of the members' personal biases and quirks. In this interactive workshop, Doc List shares common problems with behavior, motivation, emotions, and interpretation that frequently get in the way. Participate in exercises that lead you to understand―and sometimes expose―your own blind spots and limitations. Challenge your own assumptions, learn about taking ownership of your own feelings and behavior, and articulate the difference between behavior and interpretation. Along the way, gain a new understanding of intuition and how you're using it in your interpersonal situations. Leave this workshop with a new and clearer understanding of how you've been interpreting others' behavior and acting on those interpretations.

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Learn more about Doc List.
MP Six Free Ideas to Improve Agile Success
Pollyanna Pixton, Accelinnova
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

Free? Is anything free these days? Based on her experience working with organizational leaders and her research into what drives organizational performance, Pollyanna Pixton shares six ideas—and the keys to their effective implementation—to help assure the success of your agile teams. As a bonus, her suggestions won’t cost you a thing. Pollyanna’s first free idea is how to create a culture of trust—the keystone of open collaboration—within your team and organization. The second free idea is about ownership—how to give it and not take it back. Third is empowering teams to make decisions by helping them understand and internalize the project and product’s purpose and value. The number four idea is that you can only fix processes, not people. Invest your energy toward the correct target. Idea five is to match people’s roles to their passion. Her final free idea is that integrity does matter—and matters most. Explore with Pollyanna why each of these ideas is important and how you can adopt them on your agile team.

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Learn more about Pollyanna Pixton.
MQ Mobile App UX and Usability: A Continuous Improvement Model NEW
Philip Lew, XBOSoft
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

Today, many organizations are migrating to mobile while new organizations are adopting a “mobile first” or “mobile only” strategy. Because of the special characteristics of the mobile platform and its user base, usability and the user experience (UX) take on an increased emphasis. With SaaS-based business models, where users can switch applications in a heartbeat and pay by the month, user experience becomes paramount. Currently, there are no formal models describing user experience. Philip Lew explains the definitions of usability and user experience, describes the connections between them, and explores evaluation methods that you can use as the first step toward improving user experience on the mobile platform. Philip uses examples to illustrate the good, bad, and the ugly of mobile UX to build a deeper understanding of how to improve your own app’s UX. Discover key principles for design and evaluation of usability. Develop a methodology for continuous improvement of your users’ experience.

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Learn more about Philip Lew.
MR Design Patterns Explained—from Analysis through Implementation
Ken Pugh, Net Objectives
Monday, November 10, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

Ken Pugh takes you beyond thinking of design patterns as “solutions to a problem in a context.” Patterns are really about handling variations in your problem domain while keeping code from becoming complex and difficult to maintain as the system evolves. Ken begins by describing the classic use of patterns. He shows how design patterns implement good coding practices and then explains key design patterns including Strategy, Bridge, Adapter, Façade, and Abstract Factory. In small group exercises, learn how to use patterns to create robust architectures that can readily adapt as new requirements arise. Lessons from these patterns are used to illustrate how to do domain analysis based on abstracting out commonalities in a problem domain and identifying particular variations that must be implemented. Leave with a working understanding of what design patterns are and a better way to build models of your application domains.

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Learn more about Ken Pugh.
TA Continuous Delivery: Rapid and Reliable Releases with DevOps
Bob Aiello, CM Best Practices Consulting
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 8:30am - 4:30pm

DevOps is an emerging set of principles, methods, and practices that enable the rapid deployment of software systems. DevOps focuses on lowering barriers between development, testing, security, and operations in support of rapid iterative development and deployment. Many organizations struggle when implementing DevOps because of its inherent technical, process, and cultural challenges. Bob Aiello shares DevOps best practices starting with its role early in the application lifecycle and bridging the gap with testing, security, and operations. Bob explains how to implement DevOps using industry standards and frameworks such as ITIL v3 (IT Service Management) in both agile and non-agile environments, focusing on automated deployment frameworks that quickly deliver value to the business. DevOps includes server provisioning essential for cloud computing in what is becoming known as Infrastructure as Code. Bob equips you with practical and effective DevOps practices—automated application build, packaging, and deployment—essential for meeting today's business and technology demands.

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TB Giving Great Presentations: The Art of Stage Presence NEW
James Whittaker, Microsoft
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

Every hour of every day in every country where business is conducted, the same scene plays out―dozens of well-paid people sitting in a conference room being bored senseless. Death by a thousand slides. This mind numbing, soul crushing, grotesquely expensive experience ends here and now! James Whittaker reveals the secrets to conceiving, building, and delivering a great presentation. Whatever your level of presentation skills, this tutorial will hone them. Learn how to build a compelling story from the ground up. Receive advice on how to remember and recall that story as you deliver it. Learn how to use oratory and literary instruments to make the story come alive for your audience. Do your part to put an end to bad presentations―attend this tutorial.

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Learn more about James Whittaker.
TC Eight Steps to Kanban
Ken Pugh, Net Objectives
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

Transitioning to agile can be difficult—and often downright wrenching—for teams, so many organizations are turning to kanban instead. Kanban, which involves just-in-time software delivery, offers a more gradual evolution to agile and is adaptable to many company cultures and environments. With kanban, developers pull work from a queue—taking care not to exceed a threshold for simultaneous tasks—while making progress visible to all. Ken Pugh shares eight steps to adopt kanban in your team and organization. Ken begins with a value stream map of existing processes to establish an initial kanban board, providing transparency into the state of the current workflow. Another step is to establish explicit policies to define workflow changes and engender project visibility. Because kanban can easily be expanded to cover many parts of development, another step is to increase stakeholder involvement in the process. Join this interactive session to practice these key steps with hands-on exercises. By the end, you will have an initial plan for implementing kanban in your organization.

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Learn more about Ken Pugh.
TD Essential Patterns of Mature Agile Teams
Bob Galen, Velocity Partners
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

Many teams have a relatively easy time adopting the tactical aspects of agile methodologies. Usually a few classes, some tools introduction, and a bit of practice lead teams toward a fairly efficient and effective agile adoption. However, these teams often get “stuck” and begin to regress or simply start going through the motions—neither maximizing their agile performance nor delivering as much value as they could. Borrowing from his experience and lean software development methods, Bob Galen examines essential patterns—the thinking models of mature agile teams—so you can model them within your own teams. Along the way, you’ll examine patterns for large-scale emergent architecture—relentless refactoring, quality on all fronts, pervasive product owners, lean work queues, providing total transparency, saying no, and many more. Bob also explores why there is still the need for active and vocal leadership in defending, motivating, and holding agile teams accountable.

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TE Agile Boot Camp for Project Managers NEW
Ken Whitaker, Leading Software Maniacs
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

For a project manager, successfully transitioning from traditional project management to a more agile approach can be difficult due to the staggering learning curve. Using a combination of case studies, exercises, and best practices identified in the PMBOK® Guide, Ken Whitaker gets you up to speed on the essential fundamentals you need to effectively facilitate and lead Scrum-based agile projects. Learn ways to avoid being yet another project failure statistic, how to make better tradeoffs using a simple technique based on a design hierarchy, and adopt innovative ways to better collaborate with product management to focus on what’s really important to the customer. To become an effective leader, discover how to size up and then help your team rise up in their hierarchy of needs while adapting your leadership style to effectively communicate with stakeholders. This workshop is designed to give you practical tools to help you lead and motivate your team to deliver projects on time, every time.

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Learn more about Ken Whitaker.
TF Risk Management: Project Management for Grown-Ups NEW
Tim Lister, Atlantic Systems Guild, Inc.
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

Many organizations are childlike. They blithely plan the project as if nothing will go wrong. And then, when something does go wrong, they are shocked and dismayed. Risk management is not just worrying about your project, and it is not about running away from risk. Risk management for software projects is all about when you make decisions and when you take action. How do you deal with uncertainty? When do you decide to deal with a risk while it is still just a risk, and when do you decide to wait to see if the risk does turn into a problem and manage it then? When done with utmost skill and to its greatest advantage, risk management starts before a project is even born. Tim Lister presents the advantages—and the dangers—of practicing risk management like a grown-up. Tim offers a process for you to consider tailoring for your organization and discusses how your organization can grow up.

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TG Software Design for Testability
Peter Zimmerer, Siemens AG
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

Testability is the degree to which a system can be effectively and efficiently tested. This key software attribute indicates whether testing (and subsequent maintenance) will be easy and cheap—or difficult and expensive. In the worst case, a lack of testability means that some components of the system cannot be tested at all. Testability is not free; it must be explicitly designed into the system through adequate design for testability. Peter Zimmerer describes influencing factors (controllability, visibility, operability, stability, simplicity) and constraints (conflicting nonfunctional requirements, legacy code), and shares his experiences implementing and testing highly-testable software. Peter offers practical guidance on two key actions: (1) designing well-defined control and observation points in the architecture, and (2) specifying testability needs for test automation early. He shares creative and innovative approaches to overcome failures caused by deficiencies in testability. Peter presents a new and comprehensive strategy for testability design that you can implement to gain the benefits in a cost-efficient manner.

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TH Agile Project Failures: Root Causes and Corrective Actions
Jeff Payne, Coveros, Inc.
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

Agile initiatives always begin with the best of intentions—accelerate delivery, better meet customer needs, or improve software quality. Unfortunately, some agile projects do not deliver on these expectations. If you want help to ensure the success of your agile project or get an agile project back on track, this session is for you. Jeff Payne discusses the most common causes of agile project failure and how you can avoid these issues—or mitigate their damaging effects. Poor project management, ineffective requirements development, failed communications, software development problems, and (non)agile testing can all contribute to project failure. Learn practical tips and techniques for identifying early warning signs that your agile project might be in trouble and how you can best get your project back on track. Gain the knowledge you need to guide your organization toward agile project implementations that serve the business and the stakeholders.

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Learn more about Jeff Payne.
TI Principles and Practices of Lean Software Development NEW
Al Shalloway, Net Objectives
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

Lean software development has often been described as “better, faster, cheaper” and focusing on “eliminating waste,” but those are misnomers. Going after speed improvement and waste elimination can actually reduce the benefits you could otherwise get from lean. Al Shalloway describes what lean software development really is and why you should be incorporating it into your development efforts—whether you use Scrum, kanban, or SAFe. Al explains the mindset, principles, and practices of lean. Its foundations are systems thinking, a relentless focus on time, and an understanding that complex systems require holistic solutions. Lean principles include optimize the whole, eliminate delays, improve collaboration, deliver value quickly, create effective ecosystems for development, push decisions to the people doing the work, and build integrity in. Lean practices include small batches, implementing pull, managing work in process, and cross-functional teams. Al will describe how to use lean—no matter where you are in your development process.

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Learn more about Al Shalloway.
TJ Coaching and Leading Agility: Tuning Agile Practices Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

Are you an agile practitioner who wants to take agility to the next level? Are you looking to gain real value from agile instead of simply more talk? Even though many are using agile methods, not all are seeing big returns from their investment. David Hussman shares his experiences and describes a short assessment that you can use to identify both strengths and weaknesses in your use of agile methods. Creating an assessment helps you look at the processes you are using, examine why you are using them, and determine whether they provide real value. This assessment guides you through the remainder of the tutorial, helping you tune your current processes and embrace new tools—product thinking, product delivery, team building, technical excellence, program level agility, and more. Leave with an actionable coaching plan that is measurable and contextually significant to your organization. If you want to promote real agility—or lead others to do so—come ready to think, challenge, question, listen, and learn.

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Learn more about David Hussman.
TT iOS 8 Quickstart: The Fundamental Pillars of iOS Development NEW
Daniel Steinberg, Dim Sum Thinking, Inc.
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 8:30am - 4:30pm

This tutorial is a hands-on quick start to writing great apps for the iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch and provides you with a solid foundation to get started. If you are an experienced developer who is new to iOS, this is the perfect workshop for you. Begin the day with an introduction to Xcode and Apple's suite of freely-available developer tools. Xcode provides visual tools for providing your apps’ GUI in a storyboard. Learn how to connect the visual elements to code and interact with them using outlets and actions. Xcode 6 introduces new features for easily customizing your storyboard. Take a look at just the Swift you need to provide the model and controller layers for your application. Add logic to your app in multiple source files that illustrate how to partition the code into useful objects and functions. Take a close look at view controllers and how they manage the view with which users are interacting. Finish the day with a look at multiple scenes, and learn how to create and configure segues that allow user transition to and from different scenes. At the end of the day, you will be ready to begin work on your own iOS apps.

Laptop Required. Delegates should have strong programming skills and should have the most recent version of Xcode 6 installed on your Mac.

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Learn more about Daniel Steinberg.
TK Essential Patterns of Mature Agile Leaders NEW
Bob Galen, Velocity Partners
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

Currently much of agile adoption—coaching, advice, techniques, and training―revolves around the agile teams. Leaders are typically ignored, marginalized, or, in the worst cases, vilified. Bob Galen contends that there is a central and important role for managers and effective leadership within agile environments. In this workshop, we’ll explore the patterns of mature agile managers and leaders—those who understand servant leadership and how to effectively support, grow, coach, and empower their agile teams in ways that increase the teams’ performance, accountability, and engagement. We’ll investigate training and standards for agile adoption, and situations and guidelines for when to trust the team and when to step in and provide guidance and direction. We’ll examine the leader’s role in agile at-scale and with distributed agile teams. Good leadership is central to sustaining your agile adoption; bad leadership can render it irrelevant or a failure. To inspire you and your teams, join Bob to walk the path of the good and to examine the patterns of the bad.

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Learn more about Bob Galen.
TL Get the Requirements Right―the First Time NEW
Tim Lister, Atlantic Systems Guild, Inc.
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

One group—customers, users, and business—need a software system to help them work more efficiently or make more money, but they don’t know how to build it. Another group—software developers and testers—know how to build the system, but they don’t know what it is supposed to do. Bridging this gap is where requirements—the work products describing the system accurately and concisely while at the same time not missing important customer and user needs—are essential. To get the requirements right the first time, you need strategy, tactics, and a practical process for discovering the real requirements—which may not turn out to be what the users think they need. Tim Lister presents a strategy to get accurate and explicit requirements, tactics to efficiently develop these requirements, and a process to keep everything glued together when tackling a large, complex job. Take back an 85-page, annotated requirements specification template to help get your requirements right—the first time

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TM Innovation Thinking: Evolve and Expand Your Capabilities NEW
Jennifer Bonine, tap|QA, Inc.
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

Innovation is a word frequently tossed around in organizations today. The standard cliché is “Do more with less.” People and teams want to be innovative but often struggle with how to define, prioritize, implement, and track their innovation efforts. Jennifer Bonine shares the Innovation Types model to give you new tools to evolve and expand your innovation capabilities. Find out if your innovation ideas and efforts match your team and company goals. Learn how to classify your innovation and improvement efforts as core (to the business) or context (essential but non-revenue generating). With this data, you can better decide how much of your effort should being spent on core versus context activities. Take away new tools for classifying innovation and mapping your activities and your team’s priorities to their importance and value. With Jennifer’s guidance you’ll evolve and expand your innovation capabilities on the spot.

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TN Techniques for Measuring Team Velocity NEW
Rob Myers, Agile Institute
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

The velocity metric is often misunderstood by teams and misused by management, resulting in increased levels of stress for everyone. Management wants velocity to increase while developers want time to craft the software well. The way a team defines velocity—explicitly or implicitly—can affect its ability to meet delivery commitments. Rob Myers explores the use of velocity as a planning tool, its misuse as a productivity metric, and alternative metrics. Learn effective ways to obtain consistent estimates, evaluate related ways to plan iterations and releases, and track progress. Realistic, non-technical group activities help explore and reinforce our analogies. Try out Steve Bockman’s Team Estimation Game and contrast that with Mike Cohn’s Planning Poker. Discuss how to handle vacations, meetings, and sick days. Learn what to do if the obvious answer to "Are we on schedule?" is "No.” Explore the latest trends, including a balanced examination of what it means to deliver value with “no estimates.”

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TO Security Testing for Test Professionals
Jeff Payne, Coveros, Inc.
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

Your organization is doing well with functional, usability, and performance testing. However, you know that software security is a key part of software assurance and compliance strategy for protecting applications and critical data. Left undiscovered, security-related defects can wreak havoc in a system when malicious invaders attack. If you don’t know where to start with security testing and don’t know what you are—or should be—looking for, this tutorial is for you. Jeff Payne describes how to get started with security testing, introducing foundational security testing concepts and showing you how to apply those concepts with free and commercial tools and resources. Offering a practical risk-based approach, Jeff discusses why security testing is important, how to use security risk information to improve your test strategy, and how to add security testing into your software development lifecycle. You don’t need a software security background to benefit from this important session.

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TP The Kanban Racing Challenge: An Immersive Workshop NEW
Nate Oster, CodeSquads, LLC
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

The Kanban Racing Challenge is an immersive workshop where you learn the basic practices of a Kanban team by building an obstacle course for radio-controlled cars. This fast-paced, competitive learning environment prepares you to immediately apply Kanban on your own software teams. Your racing team starts with a warm-up lap that explains how your Kanban Storyboard creates a “continuous pull system” and natural self-management. Then the race is on as your team competes to build features on your racetrack while you experience Kanban norms like work in process (WIP) limits, service level agreements (SLAs), and expedite requests. Don’t worry, we take breaks to continuously improve, guided by simple metrics such as “lead time.” Whether you’re just exploring agile or you’re already a Kanban leader, this fun and challenging simulation focuses you on how teams can maximize the smooth flow of new features with high quality. No Kanban experience is required, but experts are welcome.

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TQ Product Owner Imperatives for Championing Agile Projects NEW
Paul Reed, EBG Consulting
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

Engaged and passionate product owners balance strategic and tactical activities to ensure that the right product is built—and built right. Yet how do these product owners guide planning toward longer-term goals while also ensuring that requirements are sufficiently understood for development and delivery? Join Paul Reed as he shares techniques for setting context and collaboratively establishing a shared understanding of requirements. Discover methods to envision the product and identify the stakeholders and their value considerations. Experience a simulated agile discovery workshop—slicing requirements based on value and allocating features, minimum marketable features, and stories to planning horizons. Learn how planning—iterations, releases, and product roadmaps—is interwoven and aligned with the product’s strategy. Take away proven techniques to identify and align requirements to plans, to make difficult value-based planning decisions, and to refine a lean product backlog. Leave with a new appreciation for the attitudes and aptitudes of a successful product owner.

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TR Agile Estimation and Planning: Scrum, Kanban, and Beyond Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

If you are new to agile methods—or trying to improve your estimation and planning skills—this session is for you. David Hussman brings years of experience coaching teams on how to employ XP, lean, Scrum, and kanban. He advises teams to obtain the estimating skills they need from these approaches rather than following a prescribed process. From start to finish, David focuses on learning from estimates as you learn to estimate. He covers skills and techniques from story point estimating delivered within iterations to planning without estimates by delivering a continuous flow of value. Going beyond the simple mechanics of estimation and planning, David explores agile techniques to enable continuous learning and ways to prevent sprint planning sessions from becoming empty rituals. Join David and your peers to practice your agile estimation and planning techniques so they can become powerful tools within your project.

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TS Specifying Non-Functional Requirements NEW Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 1:00pm - 4:30pm

Non-functional requirements present unique challenges for authors, reviewers, and testers. Non-functional requirements often begin as vague concepts such as “the software must be easy to install” or “the software must be intuitive and respond quickly.” As written, these requirements are not testable. Definitions of easy, intuitive, and quickly are open to interpretation and dependent on the reader’s experiences. In order to be testable, non-functional requirements must be quantifiable and measurable. John Terzakis discusses the problems with non-functional requirements—weak words, ambiguity, and unbounded lists. To facilitate the development of quantifiable and testable non-functional requirements, John introduces a solution—Planguage—and its associated keywords. By documenting requirement-specific parameters—scale (unit of measure), meter (method to determine the position on a scale), and range of success—you can remove subjectivity and ambiguity so that non-functional requirements are expressed in quantifiable and testable terms. Explore exercises to apply these ideas and develop the skills you need to improve your non-functional requirements.

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